A National Historic District – The oldest continuously running suburban trolley line in the USA. Come and enjoy a living, breathing experience riding historic, restored trolleys through scenic surroundings!

Trolley Towns of Connecticut

  • Trolleys were an important part of life in Connecticut from the late 1800s through the mid-20th century. In an age before family ownership of an automobile was common, the trolley gave the average person an affordable, convenient way to travel around town and between towns, creating many suburban communities.  The map below shows the extant of the trolley lines across the state at the height of the trolley era. Trolley Towns CT

    This historical and educational web site was created through a collaboration between East Haven High School, The Shore Line Trolley Museum and The Connecticut Trolley Museum, through grants provided by SNET and the Connecticut League of History Organizations.

    Each dot below provides more detail about the Trolley Towns in Connecticut, arranged alphabetically.  You can also use the arrows to scroll through the list town by town.  We are continuing to enhance and update pages as time allows.

  • Ansonia

    The first electric railway in Connecticut began running between Ansonia and Derby in 1888. Trolley service ended in 1937. Ansonia map The world's first commercially used electric locomotive began operating in 1888 between a dock on the Housatonic River in Derby and the mills in Ansonia. Until recently, this locomotive was preserved at the Shore Line Trolley Museum.
    Ansonia image

    BERA Library #P7597.

  • Beacon Falls

    The first friction matches were manufactured in 1834 in Coe Town, which was renamed Beacon Falls in 1871. It was served by cars on the New Haven-Derby- Waterbury line from 1907 to 1935.

    Top Notch turn out waiting for a meet with a southbound car. Charles Duncan collection. BERA Library #P8571.

  • Berlin

    The New Haven RR line between Berlin & New Britain was electrified with a third rail in 1896. Trolley wire replaced the third rail in 1906 & the Berlin-Middletown was also electrified at that time. berlin-1

    NYNH&H RR third-rail cars in front of the Berlin Power Station. BERA Library #P1084

  • Bethel

    copy408

    Danbury & Bethel St. Ry. safety car #49. Charles Rufus Harte collection. BERA Library #408.

  • Bloomfield

    The best tobacco wrapping leaf came from the Connecticut River Valley. This tobacco town was served by cars from Hartford between 1909 and 1929. bloomfield-map
    bloomfield-image

    Conn. Co. #1565 (formerly Middletown #28) on Blue Hills Av. James E. MacDonald collection. BERA Library #P4534.

  • Branford

    Branford was home of the Branford Electric Railway - the oldest continuously operated country trolley line in America and now a National Historic District. The line opened in July, 1900, and served the vacation communities along the shore of Long Island Sound. Conn. Co. service continued until 1947, when the museum took over the portion of the line between East Haven and Short Beach. branford-map
    branford-photo

    Regular service car #1911 and an open car on a special excursion trip at the Green.

  • Bridgeport

    Bridgeport once had nearly 500 factories manufacturing many diverse product like sewing machines, firearms, hardware, phonographs, cutlery, typewriters and electrical equipment. Until 1937, the city also had streetcar service. bridgeport-map
    bridgeport-photo

    Open #10 of 1904 vintage on South Main St. on Aug. 12, 1909. BERA Library #P233.

     
  • Bristol

    This manufacturing town known for its clocks was served by the Bristol-Plainville Tramway/Bristol Traction Co. The New Haven RR electrified its line between Bristol & New Britain in 1898. bristol-map
    bristol-photo

    A convertible car with its side panels installed for winter service. BERA Library #P2043.

  • Cheshire

    Cheshire was the transfer point between cars on the New Haven-Waterbury line and the Cheshire-Milldale shuttle. Waterbury cars stopped in 1934, Milldale and New Haven cars in 1936. cheshire-map
    cheshire-photo

    Car crossing the viaduct over the North Hampton Canal and the NYNH&H line built on the canal towpath. The car is operating on the New Haven - Waterbury via Cheshire Line on June 10, 1927. Collection of Charles Rufus Harte. BERA Library #P363.

  • Chester

    Chester was served by the Shore Line Electric Railway from 1914 to 1919.
    chester-photo

    Shore Line Electric Railway #5 on Main St., Chester. Collection of Harry Hall. BERA Library #P8615.

  • Clinton

    Clinton's main product was "Pond's Extract" distilled from witch hazel grown in the surrounding countryside. The town was served by the Shore Line Electric Railway from 1910 to 1919 and the New Haven & Shore Line from 1923 to 1929.
    clinton-photo

    Collection of Harry Hall. BERA Library #P8617.

  • Coventry

    The rolling hills of Coventry were traversed by streetcars on an isolated section of track from Willimantic to South Coventry between 1909 and 1926.
    coventry-photo

    A winter scene on the isolated Willimantic-South Coventry line. Collection of J. WM. Barnes. BERA Library #P6615

  • Cromwell

    Cromwell was served by cars on the Hartford-Middletown line from 1909 to 1930. Middletown-Meriden cars also ran through the western part of the town. cromwell-map
    cromwell-photo

    Parlor car #500 on a Public Utilities Commission inspection trip checking out the close clearance on June 26, 1924. Collection of Harry Hall. BERA Library #P418.

  • Danbury

    51 of Danbury's 70 mills were engaged in hatmaking; most of the others produced materials used by the hat industry, such as cardboard boxes. "Hat City" was served by the Danbury & Bethel Street Railway until 1926.
    danbury-postcard

    A postcard view of City Hall Square. BERA Library #18802

  • Darien

    Darien was served by cars on the Stamford- Norwalk line which ran along the Post Road (U. S. 1). Before a track connection was made with the Conn. Co. Stamford Division in 1914, passengers had to walk across the Noroton River Bridge. Through cars operated until 1935.
  • The piano manufacturing community of Deep River was served by the Shore Line Electric Railway from 1912 to 1919.
    deep-river

    The Shore Line Electric Railway's first revenue trip into Deep River in 1912. BERA Library #P4797.

  • Derby

    Connecticut's first electric railway began running in Ansonia and Derby in 1888. Interurban cars went to Bridgeport until 1927, to Waterbury until 1935 and to New Haven until 1937. Local cars also stopped running in 1937. derby-map
    derby-photo

    Southbound safety car #2361 at East Derby Junction turning west toward downtown Derby on Aug. 7, 1936. Collection of Chas Duncan. BERA Library #P640.

  • East Hartford

    The East Hartford & Glastonbury Horse RR became the East Hartford & Glastonbury Street Railway in 1899 and was merged into the Consolidated Railway in 1905. The Conn. Co. was created in 1907 and provided trolley service in the town until 1939. east hartford map
    east hartford photo

    Westbound #1935 at the NYNH&H RR - Conn. Co. interchange on July 4, 1939. Collection of Chas Duncan. BERA Library #P8567.

  • East Haven

    The Conn. Co. ran to East Haven and Momauguin until 1947. Its line to Wallingford also ran across the nortwest corner of the town until 1937. Foxon was served by the Shore Line Electric Ry. 1910-1919 and by the New Haven & Shore Line 1923-1930. east haven map
    east haven photo

    East Haven green on Nov. 3, 1940. #1921 on River St. is westbound from Branford to New Haven. #1199 (now preserved at the Shore Line Trolley Museum) is on Hemingway Av. on a railfan excursion. Collection of Al Gilcher. BERA Library #P9507.

  • East Lyme

    In 1905, the New London & East Lyme Street Railway began running alongside the Post Road to Flanders Corner and south to Niantic. The Shore Line Electric Railway began operating between Flanders Corner and Old Saybrook in 1913. Cars ran until 1919.
    east lyme photo

    A scene in the village of Niantic. BERA Library #P6593.

  • East Windsor

    The Hartford & Springfield Street Railway ran through East Windsor until 1926. An H&S branch line went east from Warehouse Point to Broad Brook then northwest to Melrose. Before 1910, Conn. Co. cars also served Melrose from Hartford via Manchester and Rockville. east windsor map
    east windsor photo

    The trolley trestle at Melrose on the line to Stafford Springs. Collection of Roger Borrup. BERA Library #P6614.

  • Ellington

    A line from Rockville to Melrose passed through Ellington and Sodds Mill in the western portion of the town until 1910. Crystal Lake in the eastern section of the town was served by cars on the Rockville-Stafford Springs line until 1928. ellington-map
  • Enfield

    The Enfield & Longmeadow Electric Railway began running in 1896; It later became part of the Hartford & Springfield Street Railway. Trolleys ran past the farms and through the carpet manufacturing village of Thompsonville until 1926. enfield map
    enfield-photo

    Enfield & Longmeadow line car #1. BERA Library #P16523.

  • Essex

    This old shipbuilding town was served by the Shore Line Electric Railway from 1914 to 1919.
    essex photo

    Public Square, Essex. BERA Library #P8616.

  • Fairfield

    Fairfield was served by the Bridgeport-Norwalk line until 1935. Park Ave. cars from Bridgeport also entered town on North Ave. fairfield-map
    fairfield-photo

    #1297 at Fairfield Av. & Morehouse St. on April 11, 1937. Larry Gailard photo. BERA Library #P1529.

  • Farmington

    Built by the Hartford & West Hartford Horse RR, the car line through town became the Farmington Street Railway. The Conn. Co. Hartford-Unionville cars ran past the town's dairy farms until 1934. farmington map
    farmington photo

    Hartford Farmington & Unionville opens in front of the car barn prior to 1899. BERA Library #P1806.

  • Franklin

    Franklin was served by the Norwich-Willimantic line from 1903 to 1936.
    franklin photo

    #204 at Pleasure HIll on the Norwich - Willimantic line in 1932. Charles Munger photo. BERA Library #P1372.

  • Glastonbury

    The East Hartford & Glastonbury Horse RR became the East Hartford & Glastonbury Street Railway in 1899 and was merged into the Consolidated Railway in 1905. Passenger trolley service was discontinued in 1928 but freight service continued for several decades.
    glastonbury photo

    Dieselized trolley freight motor and box car in April, 1951. BERA Library #P18084.

  • Greenwich

    The Greenwich Tramway began running from Adams Corner to Sound Beach in 1902. New York & Stamford cars to New Rochelle served the town 1905-1927. The New Haven RR 11,000 volt power generating station was in Cos Cob.
    greenwich photo

    New York & Stamford open on a New Rochelle-Stamford run. BERA Library #P1017.

  • Griswold

    Trolleys ran on a New Haven RR line through the cotton and rayon textile center of Jewett City from 1906 to 1925.
  • Groton

    Groton was served in 1904-1928 by the Groton & Stonington, a part of the Norwich & Westerly and Shore Line Electric systems. Cars ran every half hour.
    groton photo

    Groton & Stonington car on Greenville Av., Mystic. BERA Library #P6607.

  • Guilford

    Guilford's main industries were oystering and quarrying; granite from Guilford supports the Brooklyn Bridge and Statue of Liberty. In 1910, the Shore Line began running through Leete's Island to Branford; the mainline to North Branford and New Haven opened in 1911. The Shore Line Electric Railway ran until 1919; the successor New Haven & Shore Line operated from 1923 to 1930.
    copy4804

    Shore Line Electric #2 at the passing siding on Whitfield St. next to the Guilford Green. BERA Library #4804.

  • Hamden

    Cars from New Haven reached Hamden via Dixwell Av., State St. and Whitney Av. Through cars to Cheshire and Waterbury also ran on Whitney Av. hamden map
    COPY9105

    #779 at Dixwell Av. & Pershing St. in 1937. Harry Hall photo. BERA Library #9105.

  • Hartford

    The first automobile regulations in America were enacted in Hartford in 1901 - speed limit 12 miles per hour, 8 miles per hour in the city center. Trolleys ran on the streets of Connecticut's capitol until 1941. hartford map
    hartford photo

    Hartford & Wethersfield #50 inaugurates electric operation on Sept. 12, 1888. BERA Library #P9346.

  • Killingly

    Danielson was the largest cotton manufacturing center in the state. Providence & Danielson cars ran from Danielson through East Killingly into Rhode Island. The Conn. Co. and its predecessors ran north-south through the mill towns along the Quinnebaug River until 1925. killingly map
    killingly photo

    Open #21 in Dayville on Sept. 7, 1906. BERA Library #P8201.

  • Lebanon

    copy6368a

    #205 on the trestle over the Central Vermont RR & Hwy. 32 at Williams Crossing at the Lebanon-Franklin border. BERA Library #P9105.

  • Ledyard

    The Norwich & Westerly ran across the northwest corner of the town from 1909 to 1922.
    ledyard photo

    Norwich & Westerly crew posing with car #8. BERA Library #P4784.

  • Lisbon

    Trolleys ran on the New Haven RR line along the Quinnebaug River from 1906 to 1925. The area was sparsely settled and few people got on or off in this town.
  • Madison

    Madison was served by the Shore Line Electric Railway from 1910 to 1919 and by the New Haven & Shore Line from 1923 to 1929.
    madison-photo

    Two Shore Line Electric Railway cars passing on Main St. Collection of Ron Kupin. BERA Library #P12380.

  • Manchester

    Streetcar lines in this silk manufacturing town were built by the South Manchester Light Power & Tramway and the Hartford Manchester & Rockvile Tramway. Trolleys also ran through town on the tracks of the NYNH&H RR from 1908 to 1924. Cars served Manchester Depot and Manchester Gren until 1929; South Manchester service continued until 1939.   manchester map
    manchester photo

    South Main St. on Aug. 19, 1937. Charles Duncan photo. BERA Library #P6968.

  • Mansfield

    The Willimantic-Coventry line ran across the southwest corner of the town through Perkins Corner from 1909 to 1926. mansfield map
  • Meriden

    Meriden was the center of the silver plating industry; the International Silver Co., largest manufacturer of silverware in the world, was headquartered here. Trolleys served the city until 1931. meriden map
    meriden photo

    A post card view of Colony St. made prior to 1906. BERA Library #P9481.

  • Middlebury

    Served until 1930 by cars on the Waterbury-Woodbury line which passed the amusement park at Lake Quassipaug. Many years after the trolleys stopped running, dairy farms were still the towns principal business. middlebury map
    middlebury photo

    Open car at the Lake Quassipaug shelter. Collection of Harry Hall. BERA Library #P3939.

  • Middlefield

    Middlefield was served by cars from Middletown until 1929.
  • Middletown

    Home of the State Insane Asylum, Reform School for Girls and Wesleyan University, the city's first local car lines were built by the Middletown Horse RR, which became the Middletown Street Railway in 1895. NYNH&H RR lines from Middletown to Berlin, Cromwell and Meriden were electrified with trolley wire in 1906. Streetcars served the city until 1929. middletown map
    middletown photo

    Consolidated Railway open #15, built in 1895. BERA Library #P6387.

  • Milford

    Clams and oysters from Long Island Sound were Milford's principal products. The town was a stop on the Bridgeport-New Haven line until 1934. Trolley service from New Haven continued until 1937. milford map
    milford photo

    Exchange station on Sept. 6, 1935. Collection of Charles Rufus Harte. BERA Library #P375.

  • Montville

    This town manufactures paper, silk and cotton products. It was served by cars on the Norwich-New London line until 1934.
  • Naugatuck

    Naugatuck was a stop on the New Haven-Derby-Waterbury line, which opened in 1907. Cars stopped running north to Waterbury in 1935 and South to Derby and New Haven in 1937.
    naugatuck photo

    High Rock Grove in 1937. Roger Borrup photo. BERA Library #P16903.

  • New Britain

    The New Haven RR line between New Britain and Berlin was electrified in 1896 with a 600 volt DC third rail. Trolley wire replaced the third rail in 1906. Local trolleys in "Hardware City" and the line to Plainville were gone by 1936, but cars from Hartford and Newington continued running until 1937. new britain map
    new britain photo

    North Main St. on Nov. 25, 1934. BERA Library #P5011.

  • New Canaan

    New Canaan had no streetcars, but the New Haven RR began running one electric motor car and two trailers between New Canaan & Stamford on Aug, 7, 1898. Service is still provided.
    new canaan photo

    NYNH&H RR combine #4011 and trailer. Collection of Harry Hall. BERA Library #P8636.

  • New Haven

    Best known as the home of Yale University, the city was also an important manufacturing center for firearms, hardware and toys. The corkscrew, steam ship and lollipop were all invented here and the first telephone switchboard in America was installed in this city in 1878. New Haven was the largest Conn. Co. operating division and trolleys served the city until 1948. new haven map
    Football

    Football fans board #1464 at the New Haven Green. Charles Rufus Harte photo, Oct. 7, 1944. BERA Library #P299.

  • New London

    New London is on one of the deepest harbors on the Atlantic and was one of the largest whaling ports. The Conn. Co. New London Division was operated by the Shore Line Electric Railway 1913-1919. Streetcars last ran in 1934. new london map
    new london photo

    Four open cars in front of the New London Street Railway Barn. Collection of Charles Rufus Harte. BERA Library #P2030.

  • Newington

    Newington was served by cars on the Hartford-New Britain line until 1937. newington map
    newington photo

    Robbins Av. on the Hartford-New Britain line. Charles Duncan photo. BERA Library #P4827.

  • Newtown

    Dodgingtown on the western border of the town was reached by a line of the Danbury & Bethel Street Railway.
  • North Branford

    Totoket and North Branford were served by the Shore Line Electric Railway 1911-1919 and the New Haven & Shore Line 1923-1930.
    north branford photo

    Shore Line Electric Railway #2 in the rock cut east of Foxon near the town line about 1921. BERA Library #P4796.

  • copy29890

    A post card view of BERKSHIRE ST. RY. #38 next to the "Canfield" in North Canaan. The car runs north from here to Stockbridge, Lee & Pittsfield, MA. BERA Library #P29890.

  • North Haven

    The town's principal industry was brickmaking. A car line was built by the New Haven & North Haven Street RR which was merged into the Fair Haven & Westville RR in 1899. Conn. Co. cars on the New Haven-Wallingford line ran through town until 1937. north haven map
    copy33542

    #1925 on the right of way next to Washington Av. in 1936. Roger Borrup photo. BERA Library #33542.

  • North Stonington

    Hourly service in North Stonington was furnished by the Norwich & Westerly from 1904 to 1928. north stonington map
    north stonington photo

    The Norwich & Westerly line was served by this car from the Conn. Co. Putnam Division. Collection of Harry Hall. BERA Library #P4798.

  • Norwalk

    Oysters were the town's principle product, but there were also factories in South Norwalk manufacturing tires, hats and hardware. Local streetcars operated until 1933 and the line from Bridgeport continued to run until 1935. norwalk map
    norwalk photo

    Postcard view of South Main St. BERA Library #P18063.

  • Norwich

    An 1893 experimental electric locomotive was in regular use at the Taftville Cotton Mill from 1894 to 1964. Local streetcars ran until 1936. norwich map
    Franklin Sq.

    Franklin Sq., Norwich, with #2304, #152, #208, two Yellow Coaches & autos. Charles Duncan photo #1487, Sug. 15, 1936. BERA Library #P4808.

  • Old Lyme

    The Shore Line Electric Railway ran through Laysville and Old Lyme from 1913 to 1919. old lyme map
  • Old Saybrook

    Trolleys served the central portion of the town, bypassing the summer resort communities along the seashore. The Shore Line Electric Railway operated from 1910 to 1919 and the successor New Haven & Shore Line ran from 1923 to 1929. old saybrook map
    old saybrook photo

    Three cars in front of the Saybrook barn. Charles Munger collection. BERA Library #P14183.

  • Orange

    Cars on the New Haven-Derby line ran alongside Derby Turnpike across the northern edge of the town.
    copy1036

    Derby Turnpike at Race Brook Rd. in 1923. BERA Library #P1036.

  • Plainfield

    The Peoples Tramway began operating between Wauregan and Central Village in 1902. A branch line went from Central Village to the single street community of Moosup. Trolleys ran through the mill towns along the Quinnebaug River until 1925. South of Central Village trolleys ran on the New Haven RR. plainfield map
    plainfield photo

    #158 at the left on the line to Putnam & a Central New England RR train at the right. BERA Library #P18130.

  • Plainville

    The small manufacturing center of Plainville produced steel bearings and electrical equipment. It was served by the Bristol-Plainville Tramway / Bristol Traction Co. running west to Bristol and the Conn. Co. running east to New Britain and south to Lake Compounce. plainville map
    plainville photo

    Open cars at the trolley terminal at R.R. crossing, Plainville. BERA Library #P9485.

  • Plymouth

    The lock-manufacturing village of Terryville was served by the Bristol-Plainville Tramway / Bristol Traction Co. plymouth map
  • Portland

    The Portland Street Railway built the line which was absorbed by the Middletown Street Railway in in 1898. Portland, which supplied much of the "brownstone" for New York City's row houses, was served by Conn. Co. cars from Middletown until 1929. portland map
    copy19114

    Open #25 passing Gildersleeve High School. BERA Library #P19114.

  • Preston

    Hourly service was provided by the Norwich & Westerly from 1906 to 1928. This company operated out of a barn in Hallville.
    preston photo

    Hallville car barn on Dec. 1, 1923. BERA Library #P7163.

  • copy1339

    Open car at the foot of the grade in the Mixville area of Prospect. Charles Rufus Harte collection. BERA Library #P1339.

  • Putnam

    Putnam, located at Cargill Falls on the Quinnebaug River was one of the busiest mill towns in eastern Connecticut. It was served by trolleys until 1925. putnam map
    putnam photo

    Taylor's Corner, about 1922. Collection of Charles Rufus Harte. BERA Library #P341.

  • Redding

    Redding had no streetcars, but the New Haven RR ran electric trains through West Redding and Topstone on its line to Danbury until 1959.
  • Ridgefield

    Ridgefield had no streetcars, but the New Haven RR ran electric trains through Branchville on its line to Danbury until 1959.
  • Rocky Hill

    Rocky Hill was served by cars on the Hartford- Middletown line.
  • Seymour

    The manufacturing town of Seymour was served by cars on the New Haven-Derby-Waterbury line and local cars from Derby and Ansonia. seymour map
    seymour photo

    Looking south along South Main St. on May 4, 1915. BERA Library #P1035.

  • Shelton

    The Housatonic River Dam, completed in 1877, gave the factories in town a tremendous source of power. Local car lines were built by the Shelton Street Railway. The town was served by cars on the Bridgeport- Derby line until 1927. and by local cars from Derby until 1937. shelton map
    Shelton Br.

    Curved side car at foot of Bridge St. at Howe Av. Shelton. BERA Library #P23739.

  • Somers

    A Hartford & Springfield Street Railway branch ran eastward from Enfield into Somers until 1925 along present day CT Route 190.
  • copy1989

    HARTFORD & SPRINGFIELD # 22. BERA Library #P1989.

    South Windsor

    America's first cigar was manufactured in South Windsor in 1801. The town was served by Hartford & Springfield Street Railway cars from Mass. until 1925 and Conn. Co. cars from Hartford until 1932. Trolleys ran alongside the road which is now U.S. 5 and connected in East Windsor Hill.
  • Southington

    Milldale at the southern edge of town was the junction point for lines from Cheshire, Meriden, Plainville and Waterbury. Cars from many points in southern and central Conn. passed through until 1924 en route to the amusement park at Lake Compounce. southington map
    southington photo

    #1202 working the Cheshire - Milldale shuttle on July 9, 1932. Charles Duncan photo. BERA Library #P386

  • Sprague

    Baltic in the southwest corner of the town was served by cars on the Norwich-Willimantic line from 1903 to 1936.
    sprague photo

    Crew posing on an open car near Baltic about 1910. BERA Library #P6592.

  • Stafford

    The line was built by the Stafford Springs Street Railway. Conn. Co. cars ran to Stafford Springs, 29.9 miles from downtown Hartford, from 1908 to 1928. stafford photo
    copy16433

    First car into Stafford Springs. BERA Library #P16433.

  • Stamford

    The cylinder lock was invented in Stamford by Linus Yale in 1848. Horsecar service started in 1887 and trolleys began running in 1894. NY & Stamford cars ran to New Rochelle, NY, 1905-1926. All trolley service ended in 1933. stamford map
    stamford photo

    Atlantic Square in 1921. BERA Library #P18018.

  • Stonington

    This old whaling town and clipper ship building center was served 1904-1928 by the Groton & Stonington, a part of the Norwich & Westerly and Shore Line Electric systems. Cars ran every half hour. stonington map
    copy6607

    Post card view of Groton & Stonington car on Greenville Av., Mystic. BERA Library #P6607a.

  • Stratford

    Stratford was served by cars on the Bridgeport-Derby line until 1927 and the Bridgeport-New Haven line until 1934.   stratford map
    stratford photo

    Glenwood Av. at Paradise Green on April 11, 1937. E. W. Hermann photo. BERA Library #P1946

  • Suffield

    Tobacco was the principal cash crop of the Connecticut River Valley towns like Suffield. The Hartford & Springfield Street Railway running through Suffield connected the Springfield Street Railway and the Conn. Co. systems. suffield map
    suffield photo

    A Hartford & Springfield car on Main St. south of the Town Center. Collection of Charles Rufus Harte. BERA Library #P12629

  • Thomaston

    The clock manufacturing community of Plymouth Hollow was incorporated as Thomaston in 1975. It was served by cars from Watebury 1908-1929. thomaston map
    thomaston photo

    First car into Thomaston, Aug. 3, 1908. BERA Library #P9745.

  • Thompson

    Trolleys ran through the mill towns along the Quinnebaug River until 1925. A connection was made in East Thompson with a line to Worcester, MA, and a through service was operated in the years before World War I. thompson map
    thompson photo

    Near North Grossvenordale. Collection of Charles Rufus Harte. BERA Library #P343.

  • Torrington

    Gail Borden produced the first condensed milk in Torrington in 1856. Other locally manufactured products were needles, ball bearings and roller skates. The isolated Winsted- Torrington trolley line served the town until 1929. Cars also ran to the amusement park at Highland Lake. torrington map
    torrington photo

    Open car used on the isolated line between Winsted & Torrington. BERA Library #P2037.

  • Trumbull

    LongHillPP61

    Bridgeport & Danbury trolley at Long Hill. Trumbull Historical Society collection. BERA Library #PP61.

     
  • Vernon

    Served by the Hartford Manchester & Rockville, a part of the Conn. Co. Trolleys used the New Haven RR tracks between Rockville and East Hartford until 1924. A branch of the Hartford & Springfield also reached Rockville from E. Windsor via Ellington. vernon map
    vernon photo

    Stickney Hill, Rockville. BERA Library #P7806.

  • Wallingford

    Yalesville was served by cars from Meriden until 1929. The silverware manufacturing center of Wallingford was served by cars from New Haven until 1937. Both lines went to the RR station, but there was no connection as the trolley tracks did not cross the railroad tracks. wallingford map
    wallingford photo

    A postcard view of two cars on Main St. & one car on Cross St. BERA Library #P3973.

  • Waterbury

    waterbury map Waterbury is the center of the brass industry; it also had clock and button manufacturing. Trolleys served the city until 1937.
    copy1613

    #1547 at Exchange Place. BERA Library #1373. Larry Gaillard photo c. 1922. BERA Library #P1613.

  • Waterford

    This town's principal product was millstones. In 1905, the New London & East Lyme St. Ry. began running alongside the Post Road. In 1916, it became part of the Shore Line Electric Ry. which ran until 1919.
    waterford photo

    A car crosses the Smith Cove trestle north of New London. Collection of Charles Munger. BERA Library #P1373.

  • Watertown

    Watertown was served by cars from Waterbury until 1937.
    copy27890

    Cars passing on Main St. Oakville. BERA Library #P27890.

  • West Hartford

    The Hartford & West Hartford Horse RR built the line along Farmington Av. It became part of the Farmington Street Railway line from Hartford to Unionville. Conn. Co. trolleys served the town until 1934.
    copy4727

    Hartford & Wethersfield horse car #65. Roy S. Melvin collection. BERA Library #P4727.

  • West Haven

    Savin Rock had one of the most popular amusement parks in Conn. served by cars on New Haven local lines as well as through cars on the Bridgeport-New Haven line. The New Haven-Derby line also ran across the northern part of town. west haven map
    COPY23235

    Two ladies board #1929 in front of the library at Ward's Corner at Main & Elm Sts. Henry G. Wheeler photo. BERA Library #P23235.

  • Westbrook

    Westbrook was served by the Shore Line Electric Railway from 1910 to 1919; served by the New Haven & Shore Line from 1923 to 1929.
    westbrook photo

    Shore Line Electric Railway #1. Collection of Harry Hall. BERA Library #P8618.

  • Westport

    Westport was served by the Norwalk-Bridgeport line running along the Post Road (U.S 1). Cars operated until 1935.
    westport photo

    A postcard view of Fountain Square prior to 1908. BERA Library #P19145.

  • Wethersfield

    The line to Wethersfield Green was built by the Hartford & Wethersfield Horse Railway which became the Hartford Street Railway in 1893. Cars to Griswoldville began running in 1908 and went on to Middletown from 1909 to 1931. Both the Griswoldville and Wethersfield lines operated until 1941. whethersfield map
    whethersfield photo

    #1801 on Hartford Av. at the NYNH&H RR crossing on April 6, 1941. James E. MacDonald photo. BERA Library #P4508.

  • Wilton

    Wilton had no streetcars, but the New Haven RR ran electric trains through Wilton and South Wilton on its line to Danbury.
  • Winchester

    Served by the isolated Winsted- Torrington line until 1929. Cars also ran to the amusement park at Highland Lake. winchester map
    winchester photo

    Winsted & Torrington #10 was used on the isolated line between Winsted & Torrington. Barney Neuberger collection. BERA Library #P2036.

  • Windham

    Windham was served by cars from Norwich 1903-1936. The mill town of Willimantic, the "Thread City," was also served by cars from Coventry from 1909 to 1926. Both lines ended at the NYNH&H RR but there was no physical connection as the trolleys did not cross the RR tracks. windham map
    windham photo

    Both poles are up in Willimantic as the car is readied for its trip back to Norwich in 1936. Collection of G. F. Cunninghamon. BERA Library #P18134.

  • Windsor

    The first highway in Connecticut opened in 1638 between Windsor and Hartford. Hartford & Springfield Street Railway connected with the Conn. Co. in Windsor Center until 1925. Buses replaced trolleys between Rainbow and Windsor Center in 1930; cars continued to run from Windsor to Hartford until 1940. windsor map
    copy26418

    #1162 in Windsor Center shortly before the end of trolley service in 1940. BERA Library #P26418.

  • Windsor Locks

    Tobacco was the principal cash crop of the Connecticut River Valley, which was served by the Hartford & Springfield Street Railway. Trolleys ran through town alongside the canal which bypassed the rapids of the Connecticut River and supplied power to local factories.
    windsor locks photo

    BERA Library #P1988.

  • copy8562

    Waterbury & Milldale Tramway Co. #112. BERA Library #P8562.

    Wolcott

    The line of the Waterbury-Milldale Traction Co. skirted the southern edge of the town.
  • copy19637

    The end of the line in Woodbury on the last day of trolley service. William B. Young collection. BERA Library #P19637.

    Woodbury was served by cars from Waterbury and Middlebury 1908-1930. The line served the popular amusement park at Lake Quassipaug. woodbury map